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Payvand Iran News ...
8/19/03 Bookmark and Share
The CIA Coup in Iran, 50 years after

Mohammed Mossadegh
Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh (May 19, 1882 - March 4, 1967) was prime minister of Iran from 1951 to 1953. Mossadegh's name is sometimes spelled Mosaddeq. He was removed from power in a complex plot orchestrated by British and US intelligence agencies. -Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 


 
Once upon a time, in a mountainous land between Baghdad and the Sea of Caviar, there lived a nobleman. This nobleman, after a lifetime of carping at the way the kingdom was run, became Chief Minister of the realm....  -Time Magazine
 
 
Written in 1954 by one of the coup's chief planners, the history details how United States and British officials plotted the military coup that returned the shah of Iran to power and toppled Iran's elected prime minister, an ardent nationalist.
 
Dr. Mosaddegh's Democratic Mandate
In this short piece I will illustrate the democratic process of Dr. Mosaddegh's ascendance to power by briefly discussing the historical context, the letter and spirit of the law. -Fareed Marjaee, Canada
 
What Kermit didn't say: In memory of August 19, 1953
" 'I owe my throne to God, my people, my army and to you!' By 'you' he [the shah] meant me and the two countries-Great Britain and the United Sates-I was representing. We were all heroes." Countercoup: The Struggle for the Control of Iran, Kermit Roosevelt, 1979 -Sasan Fayazmanesh, California
 
The Coup and Mossadegh's Fall: A Fiftieth Anniversary Commemoration - An International Symposium (Aug. 23-24 in Toronto)
Almost exactly fifty years after the event, this unique two-day symposium brings leading scholars, activists, and other notable personalities to Toronto from various continents to address the historical record and the legacy of the coup which toppled Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh's government on August 19, 1953
 

 
 
'All the Shah's Men': Regime Change, Circa 1953
On Aug. 15, 1953, a group of anxious C.I.A. officers huddled in a safe house in Tehran, sloshing down vodka, singing Broadway songs and waiting to hear whether they'd made history. -New York Times
 
Iran's New Strong Man
On August 14 the Shah signed the decree dismissing Dr. Mossadegh and appointing General Zahedi Premier. When Dr. Mossadegh did not immediately comply, the Shah fled temporarily, leaving the dirty work to General Zahedi. There was no one in Iran more suitable to undertake it. -The Nation
 
Operation Iranian Freedom
In Washington, the hawks and vultures are beginning to gaze at Iran with greed-filled eyes. The British attack dog is barking and straining at the leash. And the Israeli ambassador to the United States has helpfully suggested that the onward march of the American Empire should not be brought to a premature halt in Baghdad. -Tariq Ali, The Nation
 
Iranians loyal to Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi, including Tehran civilians, soldiers and rural tribesmen, swept Premier Mohammed Mossadegh out of power today in a revolution and apparently had seized at least temporary control of the country.  -Washington Post
Today, August 19 [28 Mordad], is the 50th anniversary of the worst day in our modern history. On that horrible day, which shall live in infamy for the rest of our history, the forces of darkness colluded to destroy our independence, freedom, democracy and constitution. -Masoud Kazemzadeh, Iran National Front, US


 
Mossadegh, Mohammed (1881-1967), an Iranian political leader best known for his role, during his tenure as prime minister, in the oil nationalization crisis of 1951-1953. Mossadegh led the National Front (Jebhe-ye Melli), a coalition of secular and religious political groups that was one of the most important forces opposing the Pahlavi monarchy.
 
The article " a Secret C.I.A History" printed in the New York Times on April 16, 2000
renders a self-lauding, exaggerated, and partial account of the events of 1953.
 
On 16 April 2000, the New York Times published a story on what was presented as a "secret report" by a CIA operative concerning the events of August 1953 in Iran,. The following article is written in the interest of historical truth and attempts to put those fateful events in Iran into prospect perspective. -Ardeshir Zahedi
 
This mesmerizing account of how a CIA agent, the grandson of Theodore Roosevelt, orchestrated the overthrow of the democratically elected Iranian government in 1953, provides a riveting, detailed account that sheds light on current Anglo-American oil politics in the Middle East.
 
This mesmerizing account of how a CIA agent, the grandson of Theodore Roosevelt, orchestrated the overthrow of the democratically elected Iranian government in 1953, provides a riveting, detailed account that sheds light on current Anglo-American oil politics in the Middle East. -Francis Gavin
Fifty years ago on August 19, 1953, the Americans, with the help of the British, overthrew one of the few democratic governments in the Middle East. -Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar
 
Iran National Front, USA chapter
 
 
 
 
 

... Payvand News - 8/19/03 ... --



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