Iran News ...


4/18/05

British businesswoman predicts fantastic future for Iranian gas market

Tehran, April 17, IRNA-A British businesswoman foresees a 'fantastic' future for Iranian gas market, saying with entry of China to Iranian gas industry, there would be a huge market for the gas that Tehran can produce.

Speaking to IRNA correspondent on sidelines of the Tenth International Oil, Gas and Petrochemicals Exhibition (April 14-17), Managing Director of Heath & Corrosion Resistant Materials Jane Ward said in terms of its economy, Iran would have a great future.

Mrs. Ward said that however, there is a political problem in the process, i.e. prejudice from the West.

"I feel personally there is prejudice from the West towards Iran.

I hold strong views that it is wrong, it is not driven by people's hearts. It is driven by the economies in the West, wanting to make sure that Iran doesn't become too powerful and too strong. I hold strong views about that because I think it is very unfair. These political problems are created to ensure that there are problems," said Ward.

Commenting on Iran's Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh's speech at the Exhibition's inaugural session, Ward said she had found from the speech that Iran government had a vision, having plan for the future and determined to carry that plan through.

Emphasizing that she had found Zanganeh's speech 'very positive and very encouraging', Ward said, it is very encouraging for her company, as a company that wants to come here and do business.

She said she had become very encouraged by the minister's announcement that training would be given priority in Iran's future oil development policy, saying her company had already done that.

"We have already been trying to work with a group of companies that are manufacturing." She said that on long run, her company would be willing to bring manufacturers to Iran, believing there are certain products that could be done there.

"You have the industrial base but it is just the technology, we need to share the technology with you. We could ultimately have joint venture manufacturing here. That's what I would like to say." She said her company had found engineering in Iran to the 'very very high quality' so far and her company had been dealing with Iran for about three years now and most of the engineering within the contractors is 'very very good'.

She added however, her Company had found there is a reluctance on the part of the partners and contractors to transfer technology and what her Company was trying to do is to transfer the knowledge about corrosion and about the materials' use to the companies.

"So we launched here at seminars on the use of the materials in the offshore industry whether in one of the petrochemicals they share but we also arranged as series of seminars around the country with the plants they use our source of materials." She said her company staff were to to visit facilities of Iran's National Petrochemical Company (NPC) in Bandar Abbas on Thursday.

She added that her company was also to teach engineers in Iran on its products.

"We do training in a number of countries in the Middle East. In Iran we havn't done really any training until now; We have an office here with two people now full time. And we are going to expand operation into a larger operation." She said that since corrosion resistance subjects are specialized topics, her Company planned to talk on corrosion with the engineers and specialists in the Iranian plants.

"That's the beginning of how we communicate with the customer. We found this to be very useful in other countries that we have done this. I think we are unusual because most of other western countries don't want to transfer their technical ability, they want to keep it to themselves.

"I think we should be training the people that we meet here in the knowledge that we have; from our point of view as a manufacturer, the more that this country knows about new technology and new products the more they will buy from us." So, she added, it's in some ways it is a marketing tool.

She added that she believed it was morally right that her company transfer what it knew to the companies with which it is dealing.

Elsewhere in the interview, Ward hailed Iran as the biggest market because it makes so much investment.

She referred to advantages of Iranian market, saying it has untapped resources, having no ability, funding and partners to develop the untapped resource.

"So, this country is now starting as a child almost in the industry bit is growing very very very fast; so for us it is a very interesting market because we want to be here at the beginning. So our products need to be very well known here." She pointed to gas in Iran a substance being difficult to be brought up because it is mostly sour, making technically a big problem.

On long run, she said, Heat & Corrosion Resistant Materials Company would plan to bring manufacturers to Iran, believing there are certain products that could be done there.

She said, "You have the industrial base but it is just the technology, we need to share the technology with you. We could ultimately have joint venture manufacturing here. That's what I would like to say."

... Payvand News - 4/18/05 ... --



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