Iran News ...


08/12/08

'Prince of Persia' Film is Very Remote From Persia

Source: Iran Times

Walt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney has its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.     Walt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney has its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.     Walt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney hasWalt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney has its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.     Walt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney has its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.     Walt Disney Studios has just begun filming the fantasy film "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time" and has also delayed its release by a year;  it is now expected to premiere Memorial Day weekend in 2010.

The film is   not  another "300," portraying Persians as vile beasts.  The Prince of Persia is the hero of this film.  But it would be hard to find much in this film that connects to Persia, apart from the name.

Officially, Disney said the delay in the planned release date is to allow plenty of time for post-production work, considering the film will require extensive special effects to create its fantasy world.  But the delay also takes "Prince of Persia" out of the path of potential competitor "Transformers 2."

Director Mike Newell began filming the movie late last month in Morocco and will remain there until the production moves to London.

The film is getting much attention in the Iranian-American community, although the linkage to anything Persian is quite tenuous. The film is based on Ubisoft's bestselling videogame of the same name. In the game, the player must attempt to traverse the palace by running across walls, ascending or descending chasms, avoiding traps, making other types of well-timed leaps, solving puzzles, and using discovered objects to progress.

Set in "medieval" Persia-whatever that is-the film presents a story about a prince who is tricked by a dying vizier to unleash the Sands of Time that destroys his kingdom and transforms its people into demons. In his effort to save his kingdom and redeem his fatal mistake, the prince teams up with a rival princess to return the sands to the hourglass by using the Dagger of Time, which gives him a limited control over the flow of time.   

The film would appear to owe more to the King Arthur legends of English literature than to the Shahnameh legends of Persian literature.

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Disney are hoping to turn "Prince of Persia" into a mega-franchise, along the lines of "Pirates of the Caribbean," that can feed the entire Disney Empire, from sequels to potential TV or direct-to-DVD spinoffs, merchandise and Disney theme-park attractions.  If Disney has its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.

its way, by summer 2010 everyone will know all about the Prince of Persia-although they may actually be more confused than ever about Persia.

The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal, who plays the prince of Persia, Gemma Arterton, who is cast as the princess, Ben Kingsley, in the role of the villain Vizier and Alfred Molina, who is cast as Sheik Amar, a mentor to the prince and princess.

About Iran Times: The Iran Times is an independent newspaper with no affiliation with any political party or faction The Iran Times corporation was founded in Washington D.C. in 1970, in accordance with U.S. federal and local regulations: www.iran-times.com


 

Related Articles:

Persian Enigma
Pre-Production on "Prince of Persia: Sands of Time" Takes Off in Morocco as Casting Remains Unknown -Darius KADIVAR - 3/19/08

 

Jake Gyllenhaal Crowned Prince of Persia!
It is one of the most anticipated film projects in recent years and one that has been subject to much rumors, counter rumors and exaggerated speculations by fans and studio executives alike. The latest major Jerry Bruckheimer production "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," is finally set to start shooting. -Darius KADIVAR - 5/24/08

 

A Persian Prince in the Making
Jake Gyllenhaal trains hard for title role in upcoming Jerry Bruckheimer-Disney Epic -Darius KADIVAR - 7/21/08

... Payvand News - 08/12/08 ... --



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