Iran News ...


12/12/08

An American tour leader: I really feel safe in Iran

 

Payvand.com - An American tour leader said "Since I've been in Iran I've been asked several times about my concern for safety. I really feel safe in Iran."

 

 

 

Lynne King, whose last trip to Iran took place 9 years ago maintained: "Tehran's new airport is a great improvement over the last time I was here-but unfortunately it took more than 2 hours for my husband and me to go through the passport control process."

 

In an interview with ISNA, King who runs King's Travel Service with her husband in America, also said: "My husband and I have brought several groups to Iran over the last nine years and we're glad to see other international tour operators at the International Tour Operators Convention.

  

In regard to King's Travel Service she explained: "We are experts in bringing tours to the Middle East and every year our company brings tourists to Iran, Emirates, Oman, Jordan and other countries."

 

King who had travelled to Kish Island said: " We don't consider Kish Island as a primary destination for international travellers...although it seems to be a wonderful destination for Iranian families. We think international travellers will be more interested in destinations like Isfahan and Persepolis. In my last trip to Iran 9 years ago, I visited Persepolis and was dumbfounded. I live in a young country and it is absolutely fascinating to see so many ancient and historical places in Iran."

 

Note: Original article published in Persian by ISNA.
Translated for Payvand.com by BMarz translators: http://www.BMarz.com

 


Straight Talk About Westerners in Iran???
Source: King's Travel Service

Is that really a good idea?  We all have seen the images on television of anti-Western, anti-American sentiment in Iran (and to be honest, you can still read about such sentiment in the newspapers in Iran) but the attitude of the people of Iran is much different than the policy of its government.  I have dozens of personal examples; and the Americans we have escorted to Iran could provide dozens more.

A few sample experiences:

  • The Army colonel who brought pomegranates for our group when our motorcoach stopped for a bathroom break.
  • The middle-aged man in the park in Isfahan, who, upon learning I was an American, shook my hand so vigorously I thought my shoulder would come out of its socket.
  • The assistant manager of a hotel in Bandar-Abbas who got tears in his eyes when he recalled the American couple and two young daughters that had been his friends in the 70's
  • The 12-year-old girl in the small village of Izad-Khoist who invited our entire group (15 people) to her small adobe house for tea and grapes.
  • The candy and fruit vendor in Shiraz who - when he learned I was an American - filled a sack full of dates and nuts and refused payment.
  • The schoolgirls at the carpet museum in Tehran who giggled like school-girls everywhere; they followed our group around and requested pictures with the group.
  • The hotel manager in Isfahan, upon learning we had some Southerners in our group, shouted: "Howdy Yall".  (We don't actually say "howdy" in the South, but the sentiment was genuine.)
  • The wedding celebration we attended in Isfahan.  (We refused the invitation a dozen times, but when we finally relented we were treated like rock stars at the reception and stayed until 1:30am)

This list could go on endlessly, but the truth of the matter is this:  Despite the Iranian government's objection to the  West and particularly the U.S., the common people of Iran have a greater affinity for Americans than almost any other people in the world.  There are some Americans I will never convince of this.  (I have become accustomed to the screwed-up nose and the inevitable (and incredulous) question, "You went where??!!")  But . . . those with small minds and smaller horizons are probably not reading this, anyway.

... Payvand News - 03/25/16 ... --



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