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08/14/14 Bookmark and Share
Words Take Flight in Persian Calligraphy at Sackler Gallery
Source: Smithsonian's Freer and Sackler Galleries, Washington, DC

OPENING SEPT. 13, “NASTA‘LIQ: THE GENIUS OF PERSIAN CALLIGRAPHY” IS FIRST EXHIBITION ON PERSIA’S MOST POPULAR AND VISUALLY STUNNING SCRIPT


Detail of folio from the Gulshan Album. Calligraphy by Mir Ali Haravi. Probably Uzbekistan, Bukhara, Sheybanid period, ca. 1540. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper.

August 13, 2014 - During a prolific 200-year period in the 14th-16th centuries, four master calligraphers invented one of the most aesthetically refined forms of Persian culture: nasta‘liq, a type of calligraphy so beautiful that for the first time the expressive form of the words eclipsed their meaning. “Nastaliq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy,” opening Sept. 13 at the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, displays 20 rarely seen masterworks created by the script’s greatest practitioners, tracing its evolution from a simple style of writing to a potent form of artistic expression.


Album folio
Signed by Sultan Ali Mashhadi
Iran, Mashhad, or Afghanistan, Herat, Safavid period, ca. 1510-15
Paintings ascribed to Muhammad Sadiqi and Muhammad Qasim
Iran, probably Qazvin, Safavid period, ca. 1590
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Purchase: Smithsonian Unrestricted Trust Funds, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Program,
and Dr. Arthur M. Sackler S1986.305

This is the first exhibition ever to focus specifically on nasta‘liq, which was used primarily to write poetry, Persia’s quintessential form of literature. With sinuous lines, short vertical strokes and an astonishing sense of rhythm, the script was an immediate success and was rapidly adopted throughout the Persian-speaking world from Turkey to India. The exhibition shows how generations of itinerant calligraphers, bound by the master-pupil relationship, developed, enhanced and spreadnasta‘liq between major artistic centers.

Nasta‘liq represents one of the most accomplished forms of Persian art, developed at a time of cultural and artistic effervescence in Iran,” said Simon Rettig, exhibition curator and curatorial fellow at the Freer and Sackler galleries. “In a sense, it became the visual embodiment of the Persian language enthusiastically embraced from Istanbul to Delhi and from Bukhara to Baghdad.”


Folio of calligraphy
Signed by Mir Imad Hasani
Iran, probably Isfahan, Safavid period, dated 1611-12 (1020 AH)
Borders: India, Mughal period, ca. 1750
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Purchase: Freer Gallery of Art F1942.15b

Each of the four masters featured in the exhibition-Mir Ali from Tabriz (active ca. 1370-1410), Sultan Ali from Mashhad (d. 1520), Mir Ali from Herat (d. 1545) and Mir Imad Hasani from Qazvin (d. 1615)-further evolved the nasta‘liq style, intentionally slanting the script for dramatic effect, modulating lines to balance fluidity and discipline, and adding delicate, twisting flourishes. Often attached to royal and princely courts, many calligraphers were the celebrities of their time, and visitors will learn fascinating anecdotes of fame and rivalry.

Mastering nasta‘liq can take a lifetime, but it remains the most popular form of Persian calligraphy today. A demonstration video in the exhibition, along with calligraphic tools and accessories, shows how techniques developed more than 500 years ago are still practiced by contemporary calligraphers.

Primarily drawn from the collections of the Freer and Sackler galleries, highlights include the only known signed work by the “inventor” of nasta‘liq Mir Ali from Tabriz, two folios from a collection of poetry by the late 15th-century ruler Sultan Husayn Bayqara and sumptuous illuminated pages from imperial Mughal albums.


Calligraphy folio from the Gulshan Album
Signed by Mir Ali Haravi
Probably Uzbekistan, Bukhara, Shaybanid period, ca. 1540
Borders: India, Mughal period, ca. 1590-1600
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Purchase: Freer Gallery of Art F1956.12

The exhibition will be on view through March 22, 2015, and will be featured during the museum’s annual family festival celebrating Nowruz, the Persian New Year, Saturday, March 7, 2015. Other exhibition-related programs include a Point of View talk with exhibition curator Simon Rettig Oct. 14 and lectures by eminent specialists, including David J. Roxburgh of Harvard University Dec. 14 and Dick Davis of Ohio State University Jan. 25, 2015. For a full listing of related events, visit asia.si.edu/nastaliq.


Folio from a Divan by Sultan Husayn Bayqara
Attributed to Sultan Ali Mashhadi
Historic Iran, present-day Afghanistan, Herat, Timurid period, ca. 1490
Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper
Purchase: Freer Gallery of Art F1929.66


The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
, located at 1050 Independence Avenue S.W., and the adjacent Freer Gallery of Art, located at 12th Street and Independence Avenue S.W., are on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every day (closed Dec. 25), and admission is free. The galleries are located near the Smithsonian Metrorail station on the Blue and Orange lines. For more information about the Freer and Sackler galleries and their exhibitions, programs and other public events, visit asia.si.edu or follow twitter.com/freersackler or facebook.com/freersackler. For general Smithsonian information, call (202) 633-1000.

... Payvand News - 08/14/14 ... --



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